Folklore Bulgarian

Category: Tradition


To some individuals, welding’s a job for earning a living. To some others, welding is an art form. The various techniques and skills involved give credence to this statement. And like all art, welding is often celebrated, with competitions, fairs, festivals, performances, and exhibitions.

Welders and metalworkers alike showcase their skill, passion, and innovation as they create metal sculptures.

Sculptures aren’t usually the only material put on display, welders also show off their work gear, from auto-darkening helmets that can use longer-lasting batteries to personalized aprons, custom gauntlets, and modified respirators.

Besides metalworking, welding festivals also include side attractions like face painting, even arts and craft exhibitions. As a result, welding festivals are always an enjoyable experience, sometimes lasting for a whole day.

The blend of art, ingenuity, color, and innovation make these festivals ever exciting. Around the world in different countries, welding festivals are celebrated. Depending on the location where the festival happens, or the desired theme, the inclusion of specific events can make a welding festival feel more traditional.

Discussed below are some of these events that can achieve this traditional feel.

Music

A common feature of all festivals is continuously playing music. Replacing contemporary music with Bulgarian folklore music will set the mood and lend a traditional feel to the welding festival.

Bulgarian music is known for its intricate harmonies and asymmetric rhythm. The music is often fast-paced and will complement the lively atmosphere of the festival and, at the same time, lend a traditional Bulgarian feel.

Traditional Fashion Exhibitions

As has been noted already, welding festivals are not just about metalworking and welding.

The festivals also include side attractions. To portray the Bulgarian culture, one of these side attractions can be a segment to display traditional Bulgarian fashion. Such a fashion event with male and female models wearing the different fashion styles will add a cultural element to the welding festival.

Reds and whites are prominent colors in Bulgarian folk costume. Slightly less noticeable are blacks, orange, yellows, and blues. The women wear their aprons and dresses, and men dress in their shirts, vests, and pants. Each dress carries embroidered asymmetric motifs that are unique to individual Bulgarian towns and convey messages about the wearer. Every costume for women gets paired with specific head clothing and hair arrangements.

Dance Concerts

Bulgarian folk dances have close links to the music of Bulgaria. Many of the dances are circle-dances or line dances called Horo, but some are done singly or in pairs.

It involves dancers holding hands in curved or straight lines. They hold hands at different positions, at waist levels, shoulder level, and the teacup hold in which the dancers loop their hands together. Bulgarian folk dances incorporate intricate footwork as stamps and feet slap throughout, which match the rhythm of the music. It could be about repeating a pattern or a combination of moves as dictated by the leader of the line. The leader is usually at the head of the line, depending on which direction the line is moving in.

Each of the seven ethnographic regions has somewhat distinctive dance moves. An experienced observer may be able to tell the dancers’ area just from how they perform popular dances.

A dance concert with dances from the seven ethnographic regions, garbed in dance attires, will make the festival entertaining and also educative on Bulgarian culture.

Art and Craft Exhibition

Bulgaria is home to a rich tradition of arts and crafts, with specific techniques and styles unique to towns and regions.

An observation of the art and craft traditions of Bulgaria will reveal considerable amounts about the cultures, beliefs, and lifestyles of Bulgarian people of old. Bulgarian art and craft include pottery, woodworking, painting, carpet making, and embroidery.

Nature and plants are great influencers of Bulgarian art and craft and characterized by the extensive use of geometric shapes.  Clothes have embroidery arranged along the hemline, neckline, and on sleeves, tablecloths, and coverings.

The history of carpet making in Bulgaria is a long one dating as far back as the 9th century. Towns such as Kotel and Chiprovtsi are still famed for the carpet making craft.

Bulgarian pottery makers are still famous, and their works make for great souvenirs.

Food Exhibition

Bulgarian cuisine is one of color and diversity. It includes a variety of vegetables and spices, with parsley being an ingredient of almost every dish.

Yogurt is a feature in most foods, and this love for yogurt shows itself in the name of the primary yogurt-producing bacterium “Lactobacillus bulgaricus,” named in honor of Bulgarians.

Other popular dishes include Shopska salad, Tarator (cucumber soup), and Banitsa, which is a dough dish.

Festival attendees can enjoy traditional Bulgarian cuisine and also experience the scents and aromas of Bulgarian food.

Folk Drama

Folk theatre is an exciting way of displaying Bulgarian tradition as it engages both visual and auditory senses in its delivery.

Bulgarian folklore is rich with tales and stories that are enjoyed by children and adults alike. While verbal telling of these stories is good, dramatizing the stories will be even better and entertaining, as, of course, a drama will incorporate and display elements of folklore in ways that verbalizing alone cannot hope to achieve.

The folk drama will reiterate Bulgarian values and beliefs, proverbs and sayings, myth, and legends.

Conclusion

Injecting traditional elements to a welding festival can be achieved by the inclusion of some or all the events discussed. These events are an excellent way of propagating Bulgarian customs and traditions, while at the same time celebrating the skill, passion, and art that is welding.


Building a perfect rural hideaway will cost you less if you rely more on your brainpower and little on your wallet. Anyone who desires the continuation of history and a return to nature should be able to build a portable hunting cabin on a very lean budget.

Portable hunting cabins are types of hunting cabins that are movable from one location to another. Hunting cabins in this category include pole barns, which you can set up on a trailer and pull around with your truck whenever you go on a hunting expedition; prefabricated cabins, which are constructed in workshops and transported to a hunting site in the woods; and yurts, which are as movable as any small house.

Do you have plans for the next hunting season and intend to build a hunting cabin that you can move along with on your return to nature, but feel constrained by your budget? The next phase of this article will discuss invaluable tips for building a portable hunting cabin, even on a tight budget.

1. Develop a Plan, and Stick to It

Developing a plan is arguably the first step you’d want to consider if you’re ever going to spend less in building a portable hunting cabin. This step entails your having a complete idea of the materials needed, and how best to put them together, to achieve desired results. Planning also encompasses the design of your hunting cabin, bearing in mind its contribution towards giving you a memorable experience out in the wild.

2. Do It Yourself

If you’re already acquainted with the basics of building a portable hunting cabin, consider getting the job done yourself, as this will save you high costs.

However, if you’re a rookie and want to learn how to make a portable hunting cabin, following these steps will guide you through the process of creating one yourself.

3. Rent Your Tools and Equipment

If you decide to purchase all the tools you need to build a hunting cabin, you’d probably blow your budget before getting started. 

Renting the tools you’ll need from local shops near you, will undoubtedly save you sizeable costs, and spare you the agony of losing some of these tools to rust due to non-frequent usage.

4. Stick to the Basics.

Spending on enhancing the aesthetic value of your cabin might strain your budget. Remember, a fancy house isn’t what you set out to build. It’s a hunting cabin.

Endeavor to use the original floor plan of the hunting cabin without altering it. Also, do your best to stick to enhancing only the structure’s functionality.

Sticking to the basics does not, however, mean taking the cheap route when sourcing for building materials like doors, windows, roofs, and others. High-quality features may increase the cost of building your cabin at first, but the investment will pay off eventually.

That said, consider finding a balance between quality and affordability. The best materials for your hunting cabin aren’t after all the best looking. They’re the materials that’ll enhance the ruggedness and rustic design of your cabin.

5. Build Your Hunting Cabin Off-The-Grid 

When you’re on a budget, it’s best to build your hunting cabin off-grid and save money on other utilities. Less reliance on public sources, is arguably our most straightforward option, especially as you’d be personally handling most parts of the project.

If you choose to build your cabin off-grid, you’ll only spend on materials and equipment needed to work on the project.

To survive in your off-grid homestead, you’ll need electricity, heat, water, and a toilet system. You might decide to power your cabin with solar panels or wind turbines. You might even choose to stay with no electricity at all. Who knows? A cabin without electricity might add to the thrill of the hunt.

When you build your hunting cabin off-grid with no provision for a bathroom with running water, you may consider getting a septic tank, as this is very necessary if you’ll be self-sufficient on your sojourn away from “civilization.”

Furthermore, if you site your cabin close to a water body, you’ll have an all-round source of water and fish. Adapting to your new off-grid environment will be challenging, no doubt, but having a hunting cabin that supports that new life will make the transition a lot easier.

Conclusion

Building a portable hunting cabin isn’t limited to only those with extravagant budgets. Having a passion for the game, a great desire to preserve history, and the hunger for owning a rural hideaway, will set you on the path to making one for yourself.

Drawing up a plan and sticking to the same, undertaking to build the cabin yourself, and structuring your cabin off-the-grid, are some of the few steps you’d take if you aim to build a portable hunting cabin on a low budget.

RSS Festivals | The Guardian

  • Hottest front-room seats: the best theatre and dance to watch online November 23, 2020
    From live-streams of new plays to classics from the archive, here are some of the top shows online now or coming soon – this page is updated regularlyAs a tribute to the acclaimed disabled dancer David Toole, who died in October, the physical theatre company DV8 have shared their multi-award-winning 2004 film The Cost of […]
    Chris Wiegand Stage editor
  • Strike a pose and pour a Rioja: vogue master Jay Jay Revlon's sofa-dancing tips November 23, 2020
    The DJ and founder of the Let’s Have a Kiki ball is running the climactic bash of this year’s Dance Umbrella – and he’s bringing his cats‘I want you to get out of this quarantine feeling and believe this is a party,” says Jay Jay Revlon, DJ, vogue dancer, father of the House of Revlon, […]
    Lyndsey Winship
  • Australian arts restart: venue capacity rises to 75% as $60m of rescue package to flow November 20, 2020
    Arts minister Paul Fletcher unveils roadmap for reopening live performance industry, with $60m of arts rescue package now allocatedLive performance venues and events will be allowed to reach capacity of up to 75% in states that have recorded no new locally acquired coronavirus cases in 14 days, under the roadmap for reopening unveiled by federal […]
    Kelly Burke
  • Shabaka Hutchings/Britten Sinfonia/Paterson review - tangible exhilaration November 19, 2020
    Streamed live from the Barbican, London A leading light of London’s jazz scene gave an extraordinary demonstration of his clarinet expertise, adding nuance to Copland and StravinskyIf Aaron Copland enjoyed writing his Clarinet Concerto for Benny Goodman, he would have loved the chance to write for Shabaka Hutchings. Mainly on saxophone, Hutchings has been shaking […]
    Erica Jeal
  • 'He'll make your head explode': sax stars on the genius and tragedy of Charlie Parker November 18, 2020
    He was nicknamed Bird and he soared in his music – if not in his life. For the centenary of the saxophonist who redefined jazz, today’s players reveal how his dizzying speed and spirituality changed their livesOutside jazz circles, Charlie Parker might not be a household name like Miles Davis or Louis Armstrong, but the […]
    Interviews by Kate Hutchinson
  • 'A lot of crossed fingers': how Australia's arts festivals are planning for a socially distanced summer November 17, 2020
    With community transmission of Covid all but eliminated in Perth and a new outbreak in Adelaide, next year’s arts calendar is going to look a little differentCovid-19 has thrown huge challenges at Australia’s major arts festivals this summer, not least the maintenance of audience physical distancing at crowded events and border closures excluding most international […]
    Steve Dow
  • Move with Mingus: The Black Saint and the Sinner Lady hit the dance floor November 17, 2020
    Unable to fully stage their celebration of the classic 6os album, Clod Ensemble are inviting audiences to a listening party for London jazz festivalThey had such great plans: a live band, 200 people young and old all dancing freely together, performers and audience intermingling in a rapturous, participative party of a show. Needless to say, […]
    Lyndsey Winship
  • Craving a summer music festival? Here’s a state-by-state gig guide November 16, 2020
    You may not be mixing sweat with strangers in a mosh pit – but great live events are (hopefully) coming to a Covid-safe stage near youThere’s one phrase we’ve heard a lot this year: “Stay safe and see you in 2021.”This message on the Falls festival website has been echoed by Bluesfest, Groovin the Moo, […]
    Meg Watson
  • MPs to hold inquiry into ensuring post-pandemic survival of music festivals November 11, 2020
    The DCMS will look into how government can support a British festival ecosystem that is reeling from 90% revenue losses in 2020MPs are to examine how UK music festivals can survive in 2021 after the coronavirus pandemic wiped out a majority of festivals this year, resulting in revenues falling by 90%.A new inquiry organised by […]
    Laura Snapes
  • 'We have lost a limb': Azu Nwagbogu, the visionary curator bringing African art home November 10, 2020
    From helping photographers capture the Nigerian protests to exhibiting during a pandemic, the director of LagosPhoto festival has had his work cut out. Now he wants to fight ‘afro-pessimism’ and the posturing around Black Lives MatterWhen I first spoke to Azu Nwagbogu, the recent protests against police brutality in his native Nigeria had just entered […]
    Sean O’Hagan